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Awkward Blogger
Utter fangirl. Anything you can think of, I probably obsess about at least one thing from it. My passion is books, my hobby is blogging, and my goal is happiness
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Reblogged from khaleesiofhale  78,292 notes
Reblogged from thenerdiestredneck  27,313 notes

awkward-fallen-angel:

boazpriestly:

sammycriedformommy:

deanwinchesterackles:

50shadesofsuperwholock:

swashbucklingsherlock:

A while ago whilst watching supernatural, I began to wonder about the burning-on-the-ceiling deaths and why on earth their stomachs bled, which then led to to the possible horrifying conclusion that the women targeted may have been pregnant at the time.

John and Mary had a baby but you never know, they could have accidentally made another

The woman who narrowly escaped this fate was part of a new family with a new baby and again there’s the possibility.

Finally there’s Jess, her and Sam would have had a sexual relationship and again there could have been a small moose growing in her tummy.

Obviously if this even a possibility the pregnancy would be just starting and unknown to the mother and father, but it would explain the whole bloody stomach thing

Or this may just be me putting more pain into an already painful situation

image

Okay but what if Sam thought of that too.

What if she planned to tell Sam when they got back? What if Sam already knew but pretended not to? Maybe..just maybe.. there was a excited Daddy to be, waiting for the moment where he can tell his son the heroic stories of the man he was named after… maybe, if Jess hadn’t died. In just a few years, Sam would be telling bed time stories to little Dean John Winchester.

While all of this is sad as all fuck, I just need to add one thing: Dean John Winchester is a terrible name. Sam would not Harry Potter his kid.

At first I was really really sad.. Then I laughed.

Children should remain silent, and they are ‘good’ when they’re quiet, but ‘bad’ when they are not, because they are disturbing the adults and causing trouble. This attitude runs through the way people interact with children on every level, and yet, they seem surprised when it turns out that children have been struggling with serious medical problems, or they’ve been assaulted or abused.

The most common response is ‘well why didn’t the child say something?’ or ‘why didn’t the child talk to an adult?’ Adults constantly assure themselves that children know to go to a grownup when they are in trouble, and they even repeat that sentiment to children; you can always come to us, adults tell children, when you need help. Find a trusted adult, a teacher or a doctor or a police officer or a firefighter, and tell that adult what’s going on, and you’ll be helped, and everything will be all right.

The thing is that children do that, and the adults don’t listen. Every time a child tells an adult about something and nothing happens, that child learns that adults are liars, and that they don’t provide the promised help. Children hold up their end of the deal by reporting, sometimes at great personal risk, and they get no concrete action in return. Sometimes, the very adult people tell a child to ‘trust’ is the least reliable person; the teacher is friends with the priest who is molesting a student, the firefighter plays pool with the father who is beating a child, they don’t want to cause a scene.

Or children are accused of lying for attention because they accused the wrong person. They’re told they must be mistaken about what happened, unclear on the specifics, because there’s no way what they’re saying could be true, so and so isn’t that kind of person. A mother would never do that. He’s a respected member of the community! In their haste to close their ears to the child’s voice, adults make sure the child’s experience is utterly denied and debunked. Couldn’t be, can’t be, won’t be. The child knows not to say such things in the future, because no one is listening, because people will actively tell the child to be quiet.

Children are also told that they aren’t experiencing what they’re actually experiencing, or they’re being fussy about nothing. A child reports a pain in her leg after gym class, and she’s told to quit whining. Four months later, everyone is shocked when her metastatic bone cancer becomes unavoidably apparent. Had someone listened to her in the first place when she reported the original bone pain and said it felt different that usual, she would have been evaluated sooner. A child tells a teacher he has trouble seeing the blackboard, and the teacher dismisses it, so the child is never referred for glasses; the child struggles with math until high school, when someone finally acknowledges there’s a problem.

This attitude, that children shouldn’t be believed, puts the burden of proof on children, rather than assuming that there might be something to their statements. Some people seem to think that actually listening to children would result in a generation of hopelessly spoiled brats who know they can say anything for attention, but would that actually be the case? That assumption is rooted in the idea that children are not trustworthy, and cannot be respected. I’m having trouble understanding why adults should be viewed as inherently trustworthy and respectable, especially in light of the way we treat children.

By Children Talk But No One Listens – this ain’t livin’ (via unsungtale)